Is St. Corona Really The Patron of Epidemics?

There’s been some controversy over whether St. Corona, a very early martyr, was a patron of epidemics. We usually think of a saint as one that gets official patronages from Rome, but throughout history patrons were more regional because the faith was, as was everything, especially in early times, more local. So while Corona, some of whose relics are in northern Italy, wasn’t a patron of epidemics there, she WAS the patron of epidemics in Aachen, Austria where the rest of her relics are buried – along with Charlemagne, in Aachen Cathedral, an historic coronation site for German kings and queens.

The point to take away is that all saints are seeing the face of God in heaven, and can pray for us to Jesus about any matter. Apparently, St. Corona has been invoked in the past for protection against epidemics and, one would imagine, has come through with that help, that is why she is a patron in Austria. So we can surely ask her for her prayers today. If she wasn’t the “official” patron before, she certainly is now.

There’s no need for controversy, all of heaven sees our distress, pain, and confusion here on earth, and they are all praying for us. This controversy certainly has been an interesting lesson in saints and their patronages. Really, any place or group, or even an individual, can adopt someone as their patron. And, as a profound thought, there are no coincidences with God. If this virus is named a “coronavirus,” and the saint was named “Corona” there’s a reason for it.

I thought you would find this one link helpful on this topic. It isn’t a Catholic source, but does have some helpful information. Stay safe – and stay home!

Photo: Sts. Corona & Victor undergoing martyrdom in 176 AD, from an Illuminated miniature in a Book of Hours, France (Paris), ca. 1480.

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